Sunday Afternoon Music At The Michener: Take The A Train:the Musical Group Follow The Drinking Gourd at James A. Michener Art Museum

Where

James A. Michener Art Museum
138 S. Pine Street
Doylestown, PA
215-340-9800

When

Sun, May 7, 2017
3:00 pm

Add to Calendar 2017-05-07 3:00 pm 2017-05-07 Sunday Afternoon Music At The Michener: Take The A Train:the Musical Group Follow The Drinking Gourd at James A. Michener Art Museum Come revel in the sheer exhilaration of “Take the ‘A’ Train,” a show about the explosion of art, music, literature, and dance in Harlem during the 1920s and 1930s—a cultural phenomenon known as the Harlem Renaissance. It was a time that saw the genius of Chick Webb, Count Basie, Fats Waller, and Duke Ellington flower with such hits as “Ain’t Misbehavin’,” “It Don’t Mean A Thing If It Ain’t Got That Swing,” and “Stompin’ at the Savoy.” Music provided the heartbeat of the movement, and Louis Armstrong, Bessie Smith, and Josephine Baker were just a few of the performers who lent their talents to this celebration of black creativity. It profoundly affected the sound of American popular music for decades to come.

The musical group Follow the Drinking Gourd— composed of singers Beverly Owens, Ivan Woods, and pianist Diane Goldsmith—will perform hits from those golden years and offer commentary to put the music into cultural perspective. A visual presentation of historic images shown throughout will enrich the experience.
James A. Michener Art Museum, 138 S. Pine Street false MM/DD/YYYY

Tickets

$15 20 - 5

About

Come revel in the sheer exhilaration of “Take the ‘A’ Train,” a show about the explosion of art, music, literature, and dance in Harlem during the 1920s and 1930s—a cultural phenomenon known as the Harlem Renaissance. It was a time that saw the genius of Chick Webb, Count Basie, Fats Waller, and Duke Ellington flower with such hits as “Ain’t Misbehavin’,” “It Don’t Mean A Thing If It Ain’t Got That Swing,” and “Stompin’ at the Savoy.” Music provided the heartbeat of the movement, and Louis Armstrong, Bessie Smith, and Josephine Baker were just a few of the performers who lent their talents to this celebration of black creativity. It profoundly affected the sound of American popular music for decades to come. ...

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Christine uploaded this event on April 20, 2017

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